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How do we effectively combat international online piracy?

Article Published in the Los Angeles Daily Journal - Vol. 125, No. 021

Online piracy problem calls for global attack,
not US business-based approach

By Joe Donnini

The power of the Internet continues to show its strength, whether it stems from intellectual property pirates or from mass online opposition to laws proposed to stop international online piracy. The online communities’ recent efforts in mobilizing millions to express opposition to the Stop Online Piracy Act are arguably unprecedented. Companies such as Google, Wikipedia and others rallied support to table Rep. Lamar Smith’s (R-Texas) online piracy bill. The bill’s goal is to curb international online piracy from foreign rogue sites. It’s alleged that these sites cheat U.S. companies out of millions of dollars in revenue and purportedly cost substantial U.S job loss, according to backers such as the Motion Picture Association of America and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

The two powerful groups involved in the controversy are the entertainment industry in Hollywood and technology companies. While Hollywood argues the legislation comports with the bill’s goals, the technology companies stress that, as written, the law places an undue burden on online businesses by forcing them to police the Internet, threatens Internet innovation and free speech, and blocks access to entire domain names if infringing material is placed on a blog or single webpage. Technology companies also contend that the bill’s ambiguous language creates the risk of unfettered online policing of companies without any real checks and balances. While this battle seems to have reduced to a simmer, another option has been introduced; one that is more palatable to the technology industry, but still not embraced by Hollywood and its supporters: the OPEN ACT (Online Protection and Enforcement of Digital Trade Act). This legislation aims to stop money transfers to foreign websites that “primarily” and “willfully” infringe upon the rights of U.S. intellectual property holders. Whereas the Stop Online Piracy Act (and also its cousin, PROTECT IP) sought to have an entire site taken down even if the infringement is contained in just one page or one blog.   ...<Continue Reading>